The 7 Most Surprising Fourth of July Facts

The United States of America, often called the melting pot, is a country where people from all over the world can seek refuge under the principles of freedom and justice. With a variety of cultures melded into one vast country, things certainly never get boring in the USA. Maybe that's why the Fourth of July holiday produces so many hilarious fun facts.

01
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The Date Is Wrong

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Congress originally voted for independence on July 2. However, a few changes were made to the Declaration of Independence before final approval on July 4, so the holiday is still pretty legit.

02
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Two Founding Fathers Died on This Day

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John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the second and third presidents of the United States, both died on the same day: July 4th, 1826. 

03
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The Fifth President Did, Too

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James Monroe, the fifth President of the United States, also died on Independence Day. He passed on July 4, 1831 at the age of 73, five years after the deaths of Adams and Jefferson. His two terms as president were often called the "Era of Good Feelings."

04
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Several Well-Known Americans Were Born on This Day

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Famous figures celebrating their birthday on July 4 include:

  • Malia Obama, former President Obama's oldest daughter.
  • Calvin Coolidge, the 30th President of the United States.
  • Pam Shriver, US Olympic gold medalist.
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, classic American writer.
05
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Millions of Hot Dogs Are Consumed

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Will you be eating this all-American food this holiday? If so, you'll be contributing to the approximately 150 million hot dogs said to be eaten every year on the Fourth of July. If you think you can compete with the champs, head to Coney Island's Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest to try your hand at competitive eating.

06
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Fireworks Sales Reach Over $1 Billion

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According to the American Pyrotechnics Association, Americans spend over $1 billion on fireworks every year. That includes both professional and at-home displays. 

07
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The First Independence Day Celebration Took Place in 1785

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Bristol, Rhode Island is home to the oldest Fourth of July celebration, which has taken place every year since 1785. The event lasts two days and includes concerts, a parade, and plenty of fireworks.