15 Weirdest Batman/Superman Fights

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15 Weirdest Batman/Superman Fights

DC Comics

Batman and Superman have had a number of awesome fights over the years. We've even spotlighted their greatest fights here before. Now, though, we're going to take a look at some of their weirder fights. Here, then, are the 15 weirdest Batman and Superman fights. 

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1. "The Battle of the Super-Heroes!"

DC Comics

 In 1958's World's Finest Comics #95, by Dave Wood, Dick Sprang and Ray Burnley, Batman suddenly finds himself with super powers. As soon as he gains the new powers, however, he also finds himself highly antagonistic towards Superman. The Man of Steel returns the favor and suddenly the two heroes are feuding with each other over who can best put out fires and things like that. Robin, stuck between the two heroes, continues to come up with ingenious solutions to get them to inadvertently work together (like when Batman is having a hard time with a hurricane, Robin tells Superman that he should give Batman pointers on how to properly stop a hurricane - Superman can't help but turn down the chance to show up Batman, with the end result being the hurricane being stopped). No matter what Robin does, though, the heroes continue their hatred of each other until they get into a super-slugfest, throwing boulders and trees at each other!

Robin distracts them temporarily, but then finds himself transported to a far off alien planet! It appears that Batman and Superman are acting like two jerks due to two aliens having a bet over who is the better superhero! They agreed to give Batman super powers and then zap both Batman and Superman with a hate ray to see which hero was tops. Luckily, when they kidnapped Robin to tell him to stop preventing Superman and Batman from fighting each other, their superior discovered their actions and reversed the effects of their actions and the World's Finest duo were friends once again!

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2. "Superman's Secret Kingdom"

DC Comics

 In 1960's World's Finest Comics #111, by Bill Finger, Dick Sprang and Sheldon Moldoff (two of the most famous Bob Kane ghost artists working together on a comic! Neat!) delivered a strange tale that began when Superman is trying to contain a volcano in an unnamed South American coastal country. The volcano explodes when Superman arrives, throwing him into the jungle and giving him amnesia. Batman and Robin head to the jungle to find their friend and discover him in a hidden ancient city like the Mayans or the Aztecs, where Superman has become their new king! Unluckily for Batman and Robin, a local con artist saw the volcano explode when it first happened and had beaten the Dynamic Duo to the city where he convinces King Superman that Batman and Robin are enemies! Batman thinks quickly and uses what he knows about Superman (that he is inherently a good guy) to knock down part of the city, knowing Superman would have to fix it, giving him and Robin time to escape. 

Batman tricks the con artist into revealing his true self by posing as an ancient god, Xotcl, and accusing him of being a liar. Now that King Superman trusts Batman and Robin, they manage to jog his memory and everything went back to normal. 

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3. "The Batman Nobody Remembered"

DC Comics

 World's Finest Comics #136 from 1963 (by Bill Finger, Jim Mooney and Sheldon Moldoff) sees Batman caught in a strange electrical storm while flying in the Batplane. When he lands, he sees the Joker and attacks him. However, he learns that the Joker is apparently a famous actor and not a criminal! Batman goes to Wayne Manor where he encounters Alfred and Dick Grayson, but also Clark Kent, who is calling himself Bruce Wayne! Batman later encounters Lois Lane, who says her name is Vicki Vale! Superman and Robin are a longtime fighting partnership. They capture Batman and unmask him - and nobody knows who he is!

After escaping custody, Batman figures the easiest way that he can find answers is to prove to Superman that he is also a hero. So he helps Superman and Robin stop some bad guys and when they're finished, Superman and Batman realize that the problem is that this isn't Batman's Earth! The electrical storm had shifted Batman from his world to an alternate Earth where Batman never existed! This was just a couple of years after "The Flash of Two Worlds" had officially established the DC Universe Multiverse. 

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4. "Superman's Secret Master!"

DC Comics

In the very next issue after "The Batman Nobody Remembered," Batman and Superman were once again at odds (in a story by Bill Finger and Jim Mooney), as Superman visits an alien planet and gets exposed to a strange gas. He then begins to act erratically upon his return to Earth, even attacking Batman and Robin a number of times - and the weirdest thing is that he never remembers doing anything! It appears as though Superman is under the control of his arch-nemesis, Lex Luthor. Metropolis turns against the Man of Steel, and it looks like he's about to leave Earth entirely when suddenly...Superman appears! "What?" you might be asking. You see, this entire time, Luthor's plan was to lure Superman away to the alien planet and then, while he is gone, have a Superman robot show up, go nuts and then leave Earth as an exile, with the presumption that when the real Superman returned, he'd feel he had to leave, as well.

You might also ask,"But why would Luthor believe Superman would leave Earth when he knew he didn't do anything wrong?" To which I would say, hey, it's not like Luthor's plans ever actually work, right? So maybe he's just not good at planning things. 

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5. "The Feud Between Batman and Superman"

DC Comics

 One of the ways that Batman could theoretically take down Superman, as we wrote about here, would be to take Superman to the Bottled City of Kandor, where Superman has no powers. That was what happened in 1964's World's Finest Comics #143, by Edmond Hamilton, Curt Swan, Sheldon Moldoff and George Klein. While fighting some crooks, a bullet ricochets off of Superman's invulnerable body and hits Batman, almost killing him. Even after recovering, Batman insists on retiring, as he feels useless next to Superman. Superman comes up with a plan to get Batman to regain his self-confidence. He has a friend in Kandor invent a fake threat that Superman will have to enlist Batman's help to stop. 

Once in Kandor, Batman discovers that the plot is a fake and he is disgusted that his friend pitied him so much that he created a fake threat for him to stop. This leads to the two heroes dueling each other in a combat ring, according to Kandorian custom (non-lethal, of course). Batman wins the fight, but then intends on leaving Kandor. Jimmy Olsen (along for the trip) convinces Batman that there is a real threat. As it turns out, someone overheard Superman suggest the idea of a fake threat and used it as an opportunity to create a real threat. When Batman successfully stops the bad guy when Superman cannot, he both saves the day and gets over his inferiority complex!

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6. "The Infinite Evolutions of Batman and Superman"

DC Comics

 In this odd little tale from 1965's World's Finest Comics #151 by Edmond Hamilton, Curt Swan and Sheldon Moldoff, Batman and Superman come across a Kryptonian "evolution machine." It accidentally is used on Batman and he is evolved into a futuristic being, complete with a giant skull to house his extra-advance super brain. The problem is that even beings 800,000 years in the future are not immune to jealousy, so Batman fears if Superman became similarly evolved, so he instead switches the machine into reverse and devolves Superman into a neanderthal version of the Man of Steel! 

Eventually, they come into conflict with each other, as Superman knows what Batman did to him. Batman convinces Superman to travel to the past, where he can live comfortably with other neanderthals. Similarly, Batman builds a time machine to go be with the people of 800,000 years from now. Superman, though, changes his mind and decides to travel to the future to get his revenge. They battle and Batman is about to devolve Superman even futher when Superman's faithful dog, Krypto, instead knocks Batman into the path of the machine's rays and Batman is devolved into his normal self. He fixes Superman and they destroy the machine and all is well with the world.

One last interesting note about the story, though. The comic was written by Edmond Hamilton, but he was working off of a plot by a 17-year-old nascent comic book writer by the name of Cary Bates, who would soon become a longtime writer on the Superman family of comic books. 

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7. "The Clash of Cape and Cowl"

DC Comics

Two issues after "The Infinite Evolutions of Batman and Superman,", Edmond Hamilton, Curt Swan and George Klein told a story so bizarre that we've actually featured it here before as part of our Bizarre Bat Back Issues feature. Since we have a whole entry just on this one issue, this will be a brief description  of this "imaginery story" where Dr. Thomas Wayne is visiting Smallville and is seemingly murdered by Superboy. Young Bruce Wayne vows to avenge his father's death by someday killing Superboy. Bruce becomes Batman to get close to the now grown-up Superman and then teams up with Lex Luthor to kill Superman. He then discovers that it was Luthor who had killed his father all those years ago. Batman then sacrifices himself to save Superman. He dies wondering how the two of them could have been friends other other circumstances. 

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8. "The Duel of the Super Duo"

DC Comics

In 1966's World's Finest Comics #163, by Jim Shooter, Curt Swan and George Klein, Batman and Superman both find themselves prisoners of an evil tyrant known as Jemphis (hey, not every name is a winner!). Jemphis has collected superheroes from all sorts of worlds and he forces them to fight against each other for his amusement. He changes the sun on the planet to a red sun to cancel out Superman's powers and then hypnotizes Batman into wanting to kill Superman. Superman manages to avoid Batman killing him until at least the next day when they can fight in the official arena. Superman works over night creating a sort of utility belt for himself involving the plants of the alien planet. 

In the end, it is not enough and Batman is about to kill him when Batman manages to break free of Jemphis' control. Batman and Superman free the other heroes and they depose Jemphis. 

Speaking of young comic book writers, the writer of this issue, Jim Shooter, had just turned 15 when this issue was released (which means he was 14 when he wrote it!). 

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9. "The Superman-Batman Split!"

DC Comics

The striking Neal Adams cover for 1968's World's Finest Comics #176 suggests that some mystery person is causing Batman and Supergirl to face off against Superman and Batgirl. As it turns out, in the story by Cary Bates and Neal Adams, the mystery person is a famous actor who seemingly tricks Superman and Batman into believing that he is two different aliens who are at war with each other, with each "alien" claiming that the other one is evil. So Superman and Batgirl try to capture the one alien and Batman and Supergirl try to capture the other one and Superman and Batman fight each other a number of times in the issue. In the end, we learn that the actor just wanted to prove that he could trick Batman and Superman into thinking that he was two separate aliens. Why such an oddly specific goal? No clue. However, it turns out that Superman and Batman knew all along but were just going along to make the actor feel good about himself before he died (they didn't tell this to Batgirl or Supergirl, though, just to be jerks, I suppose). 

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10. "Superman's Perfect Crime!"

DC Comics

Four issues later, Neal Adams delivered another striking cover for the second part of a two-part "imaginary story" by Cary Bates, Ross Andru and Mike Esposito. In the first part, Superman loses his superpowers and becomes a new hero known as Nova. In this second part, a villain convinces Superman/Nova to try to kill Batman. Nova does so dressed as Superman because he figures no one would believe that Superman would ever attack Batman. Batman ends up stopping Nova and eventually frees him from the evil guys and Nova retires as a "non-superhero." 

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11. "The Mad Madhunter!"

DC Comics

 In this bizarrely convoluted tale from 1968's World's Finest Comics #182 by Cary Bates, Ross Andru and Mike Esposito, it appears as though Batman has been cursed by a crook who stole a legendary medallion which supposedly carries a curse with it. Batman appears to go mad, causing Superman to have to bring him to the Fortress of Solitude to watch him 24 hours a day to make sure that he doesn't endanger himself or other people (and also because if he left him in a mental institution, he might take off his mask while in a frenzied state and reveal his secret identity). However, after nearly 48 hours have expired, Superman successfully knocks Batman out (using his gentlest punch possible) and then...goes into a special storage room in the Forrtress that is filled with green Kryptonite to try to kill himself?!? What?!

Luckily, when he gets into the room, he discovers that all of the Kryptonite in the room had been painted with a protective lead coating by Robin. Batman (who was able to avoid completely passing out from Superman's gentle knockout punch) then reveals that the bad guy had actually cursed Superman! The curse (which lasts for 48 hours) was that Superman had to kill himself as soon as he found himself alone (under the theory that that way, there would be nobody there to stop him) and that he would forget that he was ever cursed. Batman quickly came up with the idea to pretend that he was cursed into going crazy so that Superman would have to be with him at all times. Now, were there hundreds of different solutions that would not have required Batman to fake madness? Of course, but, well, it worked didn't it? So don't doubt Batman!

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12. "The Galactic Gamblers"

DC Comics

In 1969's World's Finest Comics #185 by Robert Kanigher, Ross Andru and Mike Esposito, Batman and Superman are teleported to an alien planet where a group of powerful beings obsessed with gambling use the heroes for sport. They even kidnap Robin and Jimmy Olsen to force Batman and Superman to fight each other to the death (the planet appears to be one with a red sun, so Superman is powerless). After a series shocking feats of luck, like Batman and Superman firing guns at each other and each of their bullets hitting their opponents dead on, we learn that their planet only looked like it was under a red sun (due to an optical illusion), so Superman had been faking it the whole time, using his powers to make it look like weird things kept happening. They defeated the gamblers and returned home. 

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13. "Vengeance of the Tomb-Thing!"

DC Comics

In 1971's World's Finest Comics #202 by Denny O'Neil, Dick Dillin and Joe Giella, Superman is seemingly struck by lightning and ends up somewhere in the vicinity of the Middle East, where he is quickly adopted by a group of "desert raiders." They use his powers to scare people away from the recently uncovered tomb of a King Malis. Batman learns of his friend's predicament and travels to the desert to help him. He is captured however. 

Then we learn that this is just a Superman robot and the real Superman was out of town during all of this. He shows up and frees Batman, but not before King Malis shows up from his tomb! King Malis turns out to be an ancient nuclear-powered robot. Yes, you read that right. 

Superman and Batman defeat the robot and leave the destroyed Superman robot behind in the tomb, as Superman decides to no longer use Superman robots. What a weird little story.

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14. "The Curse of Krypton!"

DC Comics

 In 1979's World's Finest Comics #258, by Denny O'Neil, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez (who we've seen do a number of Batman drawings over the years) and Dick Giordano, a Kryptonian virus gets loose on a young woman and it ends up transforming her into a bizarre creature. Batman is infected and ends up transforming into a giant bat-like creature! Luckily, Superman stops him and then through a double blood transfusion between Batman and the woman, they are cured (how that would work, well, beats me). 
 

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15. "Yes, Tyrone, There is a Santa Claus"

DC Comics

 In this delightfully twisted Christmas story from the 2007 DCU Infinite Holiday Special #1, writer Kelley Puckett and artist Pete Woods give us a story of a little boy who does not believe in Santa Claus. Superman decides to surprise the boy by building a sleigh and collecting a bunch of presents and dressing up in a special Santa Clause-style Superman costume. Right before he arrives at the boy's house, though, he is stopped by Batman, who convinces him that this whole thing is beneath him and that he should be using his powers to help save people's lives, not deliver toys to a kid to make him believe in Santa Claus. Superman changes back into his old costume and leaves but then he decides that he should at least still give the kid his presents. He stops by the house just in time to see the family overjoyed by the presents they just received from none other than...Bat-Santa. Bat-Santa winks at his friend, and we get the oddest but most awesome Batman/Superman fight scene imaginable. 

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Your Citation
Cronin, Brian. "15 Weirdest Batman/Superman Fights." ThoughtCo, Mar. 21, 2016, thoughtco.com/weirdest-batman-superman-fights-4008920. Cronin, Brian. (2016, March 21). 15 Weirdest Batman/Superman Fights. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/weirdest-batman-superman-fights-4008920 Cronin, Brian. "15 Weirdest Batman/Superman Fights." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/weirdest-batman-superman-fights-4008920 (accessed September 22, 2017).