Convertible Dance Tights Allow Quick Access to the Foot

These aren't your regular footed tights

Female ballet dancer dancing in Lyon, France
Yanis Ourabah / Getty Images

Dance tights are available in a variety of different forms. One type is convertible dance tights.

These tights look like regular footed tights but have a small hole on the bottom of the foot that you can pull up over the ankle, converting them to footless tights (with the seam landing at the ankle). The hole is so small that it's unnoticeable unless you are looking right at the sole of the foot. It is stretchy and elastic, so you can open it wide enough to pull the foot through, but it stays tight and encloses the foot when it's in place.

 

One advantage of convertible tights is the ability to quickly pull the tights off the foot, allowing a ballet dancer to adjust pointe shoe pads or to quickly slip on a pair of other shoes.

Where to Buy Convertible Dance Tights

You can find convertible dance tights in a variety of different colors and sizes, including for children and (of course) men. The most common colors are pink, tan, black and white. 

They're a standard must-have for a dancer's wardrobe and are especially common in ballet. 

You can find convertible tights in just about any dance supply store and also many common chains, such as Target and Walmart. They are usually inexpensive and run the same price as regular dance tights (a couple bucks a pair).  

Also called: Transition tights, Adaptatoe tights.

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Bedinghaus, Treva. "Convertible Dance Tights Allow Quick Access to the Foot." ThoughtCo, Sep. 22, 2017, thoughtco.com/what-are-convertible-tights-1006917. Bedinghaus, Treva. (2017, September 22). Convertible Dance Tights Allow Quick Access to the Foot. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/what-are-convertible-tights-1006917 Bedinghaus, Treva. "Convertible Dance Tights Allow Quick Access to the Foot." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/what-are-convertible-tights-1006917 (accessed November 19, 2017).