What's a Good LSAT Score?

Is your LSAT score any good?

Pencil held over a multiple choice exam
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What's a good LSAT score for getting into one of the top law schools in the United States? If you find yourself asking that question, you are in good company, since that is the question most law schools applicants are also asking themselves. The basic LSAT score information is this: your LSAT score can range anywhere from a 120 (low) to a 180 (killer). And even though the average LSAT score is approximately a 150, you will have to do much better than that to get into one of the top 15 law schools in the country!

Before you complete your LSAT registration, see below for the low and high ranges of LSAT scores for admittance into some top law schools around the country.

Facts you should know about your LSAT score:

  • Only four of the multiple-choice sections count
  • The writing section is not scored
  • No points are deducted for blank or wrong answers
  • Although your LSAT score isn't the only facet considered when applying to law school, it is definitely a big deal! Many law school admissions counselors consider your LSAT score to be the single most important factor for admittance.

What Other Factors are Important for Law School Admittance?

Your LSAT score is the most important part of your law school application according to all of those law school counselors, but remember: it is only one of several factors that law schools actually consider when they are trying to figure out which students will best fit in their schools.

There are a plethora of other qualities that contribute to your chance of success once you get there. On your application's personal statement, you will want to highlight things like obstacles you have personally overcome, your motivation, your past successes, and the leadership opportunities you have sought out and been successful with.

 

LSAT Score Percentiles For the Top 15 Schools:

These are the latest LSAT score percentiles provided by each law school as of August 2016. 

Yale: median LSAT Score: 173

25th percentile of accepted students: 171

75th percentile of accepted students: 176

Harvard: median LSAT Score: 173

25th percentile: 170

75th percentile: 175

Stanford: median LSAT Score: 171

25th percentile: 169

75th percentile: 173

Columbia: median LSAT Score: 171

25th percentile: 168

75th percentile: 173

New York University: median LSAT Score: 169

25th percentile: 166

75th percentile: 171

UC Berkeley: median LSAT Score: 166

25th percentile: 163

75th percentile: 169

University of Chicago: median LSAT Score: 170

25th percentile: 166

75th percentile: 172

University of Pennsylvania: median LSAT Score: 169

25th percentile: 163

75th percentile: 170

University of Michigan – Ann Arbor: median LSAT Score: 168

25th percentile: 164

75th percentile: 169

Duke Universitymedian LSAT Score: 169

25th percentile: 166

75th percentile: 170

Northwestern Universitymedian LSAT Score: 168

25th percentile: 163

75th percentile: 169

University of Virginia: median LSAT Score: 168

25th percentile: 163

75th percentile: 170

Cornell: median LSAT Score: 167

25th percentile: 164

75th percentile: 168

Georgetown: median LSAT Score: 167

25th percentile: 161

75th percentile: 168

UCLA: median LSAT Score: 166

25th percentile: 162

75th percentile: 169

Who Will See My LSAT Score?

Your LSAT score will only be seen by you, the law schools to which you have applied and other law schools that you have specified. You can also request that your LSAT scores be sent to your prelaw advisor in your undergrad program so he or she can best advise you on the course you need to take for success. Have even more LSAT score questions? Here are the Top LSAT Score FAQs - with answers!

LSAT Frequently Asked Questions:

How do law schools see multiple LSAT scores?
Should I cancel my LSAT score?
Should I retake the LSAT?
What if I'm unhappy with my LSAT score?
How important are LSAT scores?
How do law schools use the LSAT writing sample?