What Is a Good MCAT Score?

Standardized test with answers bubbled in and a pencil

travenian / Getty Images

MCAT scores range from a low of 472 to a perfect score of 528. The definition of a "good" MCAT score varies based on your application plans. In general, you can consider a score "good" if it meets or exceeds the average MCAT score of students admitted to your target medical schools. The average MCAT score for all 2019-20 medical school matriculants (accepted students) was 506.1. Percentile ranks can help you determine how your score compares to scores of other test-takers.

MCAT Scoring Basics

For each of the four MCAT sections, your raw score (number of questions answered correctly) is converted to a scaled score. The scaled score range is 118-132. The exact conversion calculation varies slightly for each exam in order to account for variation in difficulty level. Your total MCAT score, which ranges from 472-528, is the sum of the scaled section scores.

MCAT Percentiles 2019-2020

When you receive your MCAT score report, it will include percentile ranks for each exam section and your total score. The percentile rank tells you how you compare to other applicants who took the MCAT.

For example, if the percentile rank for your total score is 80%, that means that you scored equal to or higher than 80% of test-takers, and the same or lower than 20% of test-takers. (Note: In the 2019-20 cycle, the MCAT percentile ranks are based on test scores from 2016, 2017, and 2018.)

The table below provides an overview of the percentile ranks currently in use by the AAMC.

MCAT Percentile Ranks (2019-20)
MCAT Score Percentile Rank
524-528 100
521-523 99
520 98
519 97
518 96
517 95
516 93
515 92
514 90
512 85
511 83
510 80
508 74
506 68
504 61
502 54
500 47
498 41
496 34
494 28
492 23
490 18
485 8
480 3
476 1
472-475 <1
This data represents the percentile ranks currently in use by the AAMC. The AAMC calculated these percentile ranks based on 2016, 2017, and 2018 data. Source: AAMC

How Important Is Your MCAT Score?

The MCAT is considered a good measure of your ability to succeed in medical school, and your MCAT score is one of the most important factors in the medical school application. To learn what MCAT score you'll need to maximize your admissions chances at your top medical schools, you can visit the AAMC's Medical School Admissions Resource (MSAR). For a $27 fee, you can access the MSAR's up-to-date online database of medical school admissions statistics, including average MCAT scores and GPAs by medical school.

Remember, your MCAT score is not the only factor. GPA is equally important. Assuming your overall application is strong, a high GPA can make up for a slightly lower MCAT score, and a high MCAT score can make up for a slightly lower GPA. Other, non-quantitative factors also affect your admissions decision, including recommendation letters, undergraduate coursework, clinical experience, extracurriculars, personal statement, and more.