9 Albums Influenced by '(What's the Story) Morning Glory?'

The infinitely cherished recording celebrates its 20th anniversary

With Oasis’ Britpop opus, (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?, turning 20 on Oct. 2, 2015, we wanted to explore its legacy. 

The lasting impression of "Morning Glory"

Oasis - "(What's the Story) Morning Glory?"
Epic

The single “Wonderwall” still gets heavy radio rotation, and Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds are perched atop many a festival’s lineup. Beyond these touchstones, the nearly flawless album inspired legions of artists to write their own masterpieces. Here are 9 records that wouldn’t exist without Oasis: 

The Killers - "Hot Fuss"

The Killers - "Hot Fuss"
Island

Though much of the Las Vegas band’s extravagance comes from the Strip, their anthemic moments are Gallagher-like. The deep Hot Fuss track “Andy, You’re a Star” prowls like Morning Glory’s “Hey Now!” then ascends like the psychedelic chorus of “Champagne Supernova.” Throughout their career, Brandon Flowers and the boys have covered “Don’t Look Back in Anger” with nary but his quavering voice and Dave Keuning’s subtle guitar.

Snow Patrol - "Final Straw"

Snow Patrol - "Final Straw"
Fiction

Before the ubiquitous “Chasing Cars” melted hearts, Irish/Scottish outfit Snow Patrol played “Spitting Games”— which was the spitting image of Oasis’ “Roll With It.” Those humming guitars and giddy cymbal crashes were Glory-ous. During the bridge, you can imagine Liam Gallagher grabbing his bullhorn and yawping along with Gary Lightbody. The creamy “Chocolate” owed much to “Some Might Say,” as well.

Arctic Monkeys - "Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not"

Arctic Monkeys - "Whatever..."
Domino

The title of their 2006 debut suggests the U.K.’s Arctic Monkeys lapped up Oasis’ smarminess. Their style – pithy, punkish and verbose – might not immediately appear in the vein of the Gallaghers’, but both groups radiated a working-class pugilism. Front man Alex Turned told Pitchfork that in their youth, he and drummer Matt Helders impersonated Oasis for a school talent show. They came up short next to a group of Spice Girls imposers.

Keane - "Hopes and Fears"

Keane - "Hopes and Fears"
Island

Soaring sing-alongs are the specialty of Tom Chaplin and company. Much like “Don’t Look Back in Anger,” Keane’s breakout, “Somewhere Only We Know,” relied on elongated vowels and heartfelt lyrics. Though Keane initially lacked guitars, their reverence of Oasis’ melodies and showmanship shone through. Their 2006 follow-up, Under the Iron Sea, incorporated the wah pedals and other effects that Oasis ax man Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs commanded.

Coldplay - "Parachutes"

Coldplay - "Parachutes"
Parlophone

Though Chris Martin eventually surmounted the Gallaghers in fame via conscious uncoupling with Gwyneth Paltrow, he still bows at their altar. In 2013, the “Yellow” singer posted a video of “Cast No Shadow” on Facebook, adding: “If I ever get too full of myself, I just listen to What's The Story and realise I've still got a way to go." Coldplay’s first full length, 2000’s Parachutes, wore the What’s the Story influence on its sleeve.

Maroon 5 - "Songs About Jane"

Maroon 5 - "Songs About Jane"
A&M/Octone

On the surface, The Voice judge Adam Levine has as much in common with the Gallaghers as a poodle does with a bulldog. Though it might not be obvious in their adult contemporary-funk songs, Maroon 5 adore Oasis— even though Noel Gallagher publicly denounced that band dozens of times. Levine told The Telegraph in 2007: “We love Oasis. One of the best bands ever. The simplicity of it all is just so perfect. The melodies. That's my biggest thing, melodies.”

The Strokes - "Is This It"

The Strokes - "Is This It"
RCA

Gravitating toward the sparser rock tracks on Morning Glory, the Strokes’ 2001 freshman LP set up another parallel: In the garage revival, the street-smart New Yorkers were the Oasis to the White Stripes’ Blur. The media pitted those groups against one another— though Britpop and retro rock benefited from all of their music. To show solidarity, the Gallaghers allegedly caught the Strokes in concert before the release of Is This It.

Ryan Adams - "Love Is Hell"

Ryan Adams - "Love Is Hell"
Virgin/EMI

Before he was paying tribute to Taylor Swift, troubadour Ryan Adams earned kudos for his acoustic version of “Wonderwall.” He included the cover on his 2004 EP combo, landing at the 27th spot on the U.K. Singles charts. It got Noel’s stamp of approval, as he told SPIN in 2008: “I think Ryan Adams is the only person who ever got that song right.” As for the rest of Love Is Hell, there is a Mancunian tone to it all. The dreary “Political Scientist” recalls the lonely “Cast No Shadow” and Adams’ vocals have a Liam-like scratchiness to them.

Jet - "Get Born"

Jet - "Get Born"
Elektra

Brothers Nic and Chris Cester used to lash out at bloggers who compared Jet to Oasis. The Australian gents insisted they got on fine, unlike the ever-arguing Liam and Noel. The familial issue aside, their hit album Get Born had moments of Morning Glory: the schizophrenic “Lazy Gun”; the tambourine smasher “Rollover D.J.”; and the plea to not look back in anger, “Look What You’ve Done.” Jet eventually became tour mates with Oasis.