Women's History Month Printables

Suffragettes voting with large female gender symbol pencil
Mitch Blunt/Getty Images

You probably know that Sacajawea played a vital role in the Lewis and Clark expedition, but did you know that the first woman to run for U.S. President was Victoria Woodhull in 1872 (even though women didn't win the right to vote until 1920)?

Or that Nellie Tayloe Ross was the first female state governor? She was governor of Wyoming which was also the first state to grant women the right to vote.

Did you know that the inventor of the windshield wiper was a woman?

It was President Jimmy Carter in 1980 who issued the first Presidential Proclamation naming the week of March 8, National Women's History Week.

In 1987, Congress passed a resolution officially designating the entire month of March as National Women's History Month. Now, we celebrate the remarkable achievements and contributions of women to U.S. society during National Women's History Month with the current U.S. president issuing a Presidential Proclamation each year on or around March 8 to recognize the event.

Women's contributions are also recognized globally on March 8 as a part of International Women's Day.

You may wish to commemorate Women's History Month in your homeschool or classroom. You can do so by:

  • choosing a famous woman from history to research
  • hosting a Women's History fair inviting students in your homeschool group or class to choose a renowned woman to represent
  • writing a letter of appreciation to an influential woman in your life
  • reading biographies about women who have contributed to U.S. society
  • interviewing a prominent woman in your community

Each year, the National Women's History Project announces a theme for that year's Women's History Month. You may wish to have your students write an essay based on this year's theme.  

You can also introduce the topic of Women's History Month to your students with the following printables. These printables introduce several women from U.S. history whose legacies may be recognized even if their names aren't.

See how many of these women are familiar to your students and spend some time learning about those whose names your children may not initially recognize.

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Famous Firsts Vocabulary

Use this Famous Firsts vocabulary worksheet to introduce your students to nine famous women from history. Visit your local library to borrow engaging biographies about each, or use the Internet to discover more about each woman and her contributions to U.S. history. 

Students will match the woman's name from the word bank to her accomplishment on the lines above.

 

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Famous Firsts Wordsearch

Print the pdf: Famous Firsts Word Search

Use the Famous Firsts word search to review the women your student learned about while completing the vocabulary sheet. Ask them to tell you one fact about each that they found intriguing.

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Famous Firsts Crossword Puzzle

Students can review what they've learned about Famous Firsts and women from American history by completing this crossword puzzle. They should choose the correct name from the word bank to match each woman to her accomplishment, which is listed as a puzzle clue. 

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Famous Firsts Challenge

Print the pdf: Famous Firsts Challenge

Challenge your students to demonstrate what they've learned with the Famous Firsts Challenge. Students will answer each multiple choice question based on what they've discovered about these pioneers in American history.

They can use the Internet or library to refresh their memory for any answers about which they're unsure. 

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Famous Firsts Alphabet Activity

Elementary-aged students can practice their alphabetizing skills by listing the names of each famous woman in alphabetical order.

For added challenge, instruct your students to alphabetize by last name, writing the last name first followed by a comma and the woman's first name.

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Famous Firsts Draw and Write

Your students can complete their study of Famous Firsts and women from American history, by choosing one of the women to whom they've been introduced and writing what they've learned about her. 

Students should include a drawing depicting their subject's contribution to history.

You may also wish to invite your students to choose another woman from history (one not introduced in this study) to research and write about.