World Junior Hockey Championships

Year-by-Year Medal Results Dating to 1974

Sidney Crosby and Alexander Ovechkin at the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championship.
Sidney Crosby and Alexander Ovechkin shake hands after the Gold medal Game at the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championship. Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

The World Junior Hockey Championships began as a six-team invitational tournament in 1974. In 1977, the International Ice Hockey Federation-sanctioned the event and assumed control. Below are the year-by-year results of this important annual tournament. The tournament is sometimes played in multiple cities, as indicated in parentheses after the date of the tourney.

The 2010s - USA Three-Peat

In a stunning win -- its third title of the decade -- Team USA rallied from a two-goal deficit to beat a powerful Canadian team during the January 2017 final.

 "What a terrific game between two fantastic hockey countries," Bob Motzko, head coach of Team USA, told USA Hockey. "When we got together in Michigan for our camp this summer, there was something special with these guys. ... This is a special group that will forever walk together."

2017 (Montreal and Toronto)

  • Gold: USA
  • Silver: Canada
  • Bronze: Russia

2016 (Helsinki)

  • Gold: Finland
  • Silver: Russia
  • Bronze: USA

2015 (Toronto, Ontario, Montreal)

  • Gold: Canada
  • Silver: Russia
  • Bronze: Slovakia

2014 (Malmo, Sweden)

  • Gold: Finland
  • Silver: Sweden
  • Bronze: Russia

2013 (Ufa, Russia)

  • Gold: USA
  • Silver: Sweden
  • Bronze: Russia

2012 (Edmonton and Calgary, Canada)

  • Gold: Sweden
  • Silver: Russia
  • Bronze: Canada

2011 (Buffalo and Niagara, USA)

  • Gold: Russia
  • Silver: Canada
  • Bronze: USA

2010 (Saskatoon and Regina, Canada)

  • Gold: USA
  • Silver: Canada
  • Bronze: Sweden

The 2000s - Canada Dominates

Canada took the championship five straight years in the second half of the decade and never finished lower than third place in the 2000s.

2009 (Ottawa, Canada)

  • Gold: Canada
  • Silver: Sweden
  • Bronze: Russia

2008 (Pardubice and Liberec, Czech Republic)

  • Gold: Canada
  • Silver: Sweden
  • Bronze: Russia

2007 (Leksand and Mora, Sweden)

  • Gold: Canada
  • Silver: Russia
  • Bronze: USA

2006 (Vancouver, Kelowna and Kamloops, Canada)

  • Gold: Canada
  • Silver: Russia
  • Bronze: Finland

    2005 (Grand Forks and Thief River Falls, North Dakota)

    • Gold: Canada
    • Silver: Russia
    • Bronze: Czech Republic

    2004 (Helsinki and Hameenlinna, Finland)

    • Gold: USA
    • Silver: Canada
    • Bronze: Finland

    2003: Halifax and Sydney, Canada)

    • Gold: Russia
    • Silver: Canada
    • Bronze: Finland

    2002 (Pardubice and Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic)

    • Gold: Russia
    • Silver: Canada
    • Bronze: Finland

    2001 (Moscow and Podolsk, Russia)

    • Gold: Czech Republic
    • Silver: Finland
    • Bronze: Canada

    2000 (Skelleftea and Umea, Sweden)

    • Gold: Czech Republic
    • Silver: Russia
    • Bronze: Canada

    The 1990s - Canada On Top

    Powerful Canadian teams won six of nine golds during the decade -- including five in a row in the early to middle part of the 1990s. 

    1999 (Winnipeg, Canada)

    • Gold: Russia
    • Silver: Canada
    • Bronze: Slovakia

    1998 (Helsinki and Hameenlinna, Finland)

    • Gold: Finland
    • Silver: Russia
    • Bronze: Switzerland

    1997 (Geneva and Morges, Switzerland)

    • Gold: Canada
    • Silver: USA
    • Bronze: Russia

    1996 (Boston)

    • Gold: Canada
    • Silver: Sweden
    • Bronze: Russia

    1995 (Red Deer, Canada)

    • Gold: Canada
    • Silver: Russia
    • Bronze: Sweden

    1994 (Ostrava and Frydek-Mistek, Czech Republic)

    • Gold: Canada
    • Silver: Sweden
    • Bronze: Russia

    1993 (Gavle, Sweden)

    • Gold: Canada
    • Silver: Sweden
    • Bronze: Czechoslovakia

      1992 (Fussen and Kaufbeuren, Germany)

      • Gold: Commonwealth of Independent States
      • Silver: Sweden
      • Bronze: USA

      1991 (Saskatoon, Canada)

      • Gold: Canada
      • Silver: Soviet Union
      • Bronze: Czechoslovakia

      1990 (Helsinki and Turku, Finland)

      • Gold: Canada
      • Silver: Soviet Union
      • Bronze: Czechoslovakia

      The 1980s - Favorites on Top

      Canada and the Soviet Union were disqualified from the 1987 tournament after a bench-clearing brawl. Other than that, the decade yielded the favored list of winners.

      1989 (Anchorage, Alaska)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Sweden
      • Bronze: Czechoslovakia

      1988 (Moscow)

      • Gold: Canada
      • Silver: Soviet Union
      • Bronze: Finland

      1987 (Piestany, Czechoslovakia)

      • Gold: Finland
      • Silver: Czechoslovakia
      • Bronze: Sweden

      1986 (Hamilton, Canada)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Canada
      • Bronze: USA

      1985 (Helsinki and Turku, Finland)

      • Gold: Canada
      • Silver: Czechoslovakia
      • Bronze: Soviet Union

      1984 (Norrköping and Nyköping, Sweden)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Finland
      • Bronze: Czechoslovakia

      1983 (Leningrad, Soviet Union)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Czechoslovakia
      • Bronze: Canada

      1982 (Minnesota)

      • Gold: Canada
      • Silver: Czechoslovakia
      • Bronze: Finland

      1981 (Fussen, Germany)

      • Gold: Sweden
      • Silver: Finland
      • Bronze: Soviet Union

      1980 (Helsinki)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Finland
      • Bronze: Sweden

      1970s - Soviets Dominate

      Before the breakup of the Soviet Union, the Soviets dominated the tournament -- winning gold in the event's first six years.

      1979 (Karlstad, Sweden)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Czechoslovakia
      • Bronze: Sweden

      1978 (Montreal)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Sweden
      • Bronze: Canada

      1977 (Banská Bystrica and Zvolen, Czechoslovakia)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Canada
      • Bronze: Finland

      1976 (Turku, Finland)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Canada
      • Bronze: Czechoslovakia

      1975 (Winnipeg, Canada)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Canada
      • Bronze: Sweden

      1974 (Leningrad)

      • Gold: Soviet Union
      • Silver: Finland
      • Bronze: Canada